Standard Process Purification Program


Having been on so many other restrictive diets, I am familiar with using unusual ingredients and methods to come up with something edible.  Many of the recipes for the Autoimmune Protocol can work, sometimes with slight adaptation, for the SPPP.

I looked at several different AIP recipes for granola, and because of ingredients I did/did not have, took some of the ideas and did my own thing.  I didn’t really even measure, so this is approximate.

  • 2 ripe bananas, mashed
  • 3/4 cup flaked and/or shredded coconut, unsweetened (I used a combo)
  • 3/4 cup tigernut flour
  • 1/2 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • pinch of salt

Combine to make a thick batter (if necessary, add more flour or coconut to make a spreadable consistency).  Spread about 1/2″ thick on a parchment-lined baking sheet.  Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.  After this time, it should be firmed up.  Chop it up into chunks with a spatula, spread evenly on the pan, and put back in the oven for another 15 or 20 minutes, or until your preferred level of crunchy/chewy is reached.


Notes:

I realize tigernut flour is a specialty ingredient that few people are likely to have in their pantry (btw, tigernuts are not nuts at all, they are tubers).   I happened to have some from my stint with AIP.  You could try using coconut flour, although it will act differently.  It absorbs moisture like crazy and I don’t think you’d need as much of it.  Or perhaps ground flax or hemp seeds would work.

I consider this a snacking granola, but you could try it with some compliant coconut or hemp milk if you want to eat it like cereal.

Take this recipe and make it fit your diet:

  • For AIP, omit the sunflower seeds and add more coconut or chopped tigernuts.  Add dried fruit if you tolerate it.  Also make sure you are using alcohol-free vanilla.
  • For Paleo, add nuts and dried fruit as desired.  If you don’t have tigernut flour, try using finely ground almond flour.
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First, a synopsis of the last two years.  In early 2015, I was more or less following the Wahls Protocol…not perfectly, but in general was eating healthful and clean foods.  I didn’t feel like I was having any results, and so in April I stepped it up to the Autoimmune Protocol, or AIP.  It’s even more restrictive!  I followed it pretty strictly from April 13 through the end of July, so 3 1/2 months.  I did not feel better; I felt worse.  I was down to 82 lbs and just weak.  In August I added back some nightshade spices, a little dairy (butter), and some gluten free grains.  Eventually I went back to normal but kept it gluten free.  I felt better just in general, but had no noticeable affect on my MS symptoms (either when on the AIP or afterwards).

On Labor Day weekend we took an impromptu trip to the beach and all food restrictions flew out the window.  From that point on, I was completely unrestricted.  By the end of the month I decided I needed to do something for general health, so for October Craig and I did a Whole 30.  This I pretty much followed to a T (there were a few times I did something that was out of the “spirit” of the W30, like drinking an ingredient-compliant mango smoothie for some sweetness, but never cheated with forbidden foods).  Again, I felt some improvement in general health, but no affect on MS symptoms.  I did not do re-introductions as suggested by W30, but went back to normal near-SAD diet. In April 2016, we started another W30, but ended up only doing a W15.

Since then, my diet has been pretty atrocious. In the last 6 months or so, my status has really worsened.  Walking is difficult; I sometimes have a hard time even just getting around the house.  I can’t say that definitively that food has contributed to my decline.  In all my diet forays, keeping track of symptoms etc., I have never found any direct correlation between food and symptoms one way or another.  There were never any obvious food triggers that affected symptoms negatively, but neither were there any positive effects.

However, I still believe that it is possible for food to affect disease, and certainly that better food choices are beneficial to anyone’s health.  So in the back of my mind, I always felt that I would get back at it at some point.  I was just dragging my feet mainly because it takes so much effort and energy to cook this way.  There is very little in the way of convenience food for this lifestyle, and cooking, often several times a day, is mandatory. And I sincerely do not have the strength to do it.  Fifteen minutes in the kitchen (prep, cooking) totally does me in to the point of being unable to walk.

Then a couple months ago, Craig got the great idea to do a Standard Process 21 Day Cleanse with his patients.  He jumped in with both feet without really even giving it any thought He does have experience with the program in that he has “prescribed” it for patients before, but he has never done it himself.  He asked if I wanted to do it with him.  I was reluctant, and then I realized that I was going to be participating whether I wanted to or not.  Because what he didn’t consider is that he doesn’t cook!  To be fair, he’s the one out working all day, and I have always been the domestic one, and he can pull together a meal if necessary.  But planning out 3 weeks of specialized meals and preparing them is foreign to him.

I still don’t know how I’m going to manage all the physical work of it.  I know Craig will help, but again, I hate to ask him to start chopping and sauteing as soon as he walks in the door after a twelve hour day.  I do plan to take some of my own advice from the first time I did the SPPP (so glad I kept this blog!), and prepare some things ahead of time.

So there it is!  January 10 we start the 21 day program along with about 15 of Craig’s patients.  I’ll try to keep up a log of it here, like last time.

Last day!  I’m doing a little happy dance!

Breakfast:

mixed berry/banana shake (frozen fruit, 2 C/1 F, water, 2 Tbsp ground flax)

5 Green Food caps

Lunch:

chicken and rice soup

Snack:

tropical shake

5 Green Food caps

clementine

Dinner:

1/3 cup brown rice

mixed veggie grill

Notes:

I am glad to be done, but I don’t know that I’ll change my diet all that much.  I need to do some more reading of The MS Recovery Diet and get up to speed, but I know that at least I can add in non-gluten grains, and it will be a relief to eat some rice crackers or something like that!

I made my soup just like last time, but w/ Trader Joe’s Organic Hearty Vegetable Broth instead of Wolfgang Puck’s All Natural Vegetable Cooking Stock.  You can see just by looking that WP’s (top) was richer, and that went for the flavor as well.  I much preferred the flavor of WP, but comparing ingredients of the two showed that TJ’s were superior.  TJ’s has water, vegetables, and sea salt only and is gluten-free.  WP, in addition to those items, has Yeast Extract, Cane Juice Solids , Natural Flavors, Safflower Oil, Barley Malt Extract, and is not GF.

WP also makes an Organic Vegetable Broth, but it contains Cane Juice Solids, Maltodextrin, Natural Flavor, and Soybean Oil.  Soy is not allowed on either of my diets, and while none of those other ingredients is necessarily evil, I prefer that TJ’s doesn’t have them.

 

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Breakfast:

chocolate raspberry shake (2 C/1 F, 2 Tbsp ground flax, water, berries, chocolate stevia)

5 Green Food caps

Lunch:

Chipotle Mexican Grill salad (romaine, grilled chicken, fresh tomato salsa, small amt of chipotle honey vinaigrette)

Snack:

mango, pineapple, banana shake (2 C/1 F)

5 Green Food caps

Dinner:

cod

ratatouille

brown rice

green salad

Snack:

1/2 sm caramel apple

Notes:

I checked the Chipotle website before lunch for nutrition info, and the only issue was that the chicken and the vinaigrette contain soy ingredients.

For the cod, I put a little EVOO on it and sprinkled lightly w/ Tony Cachere’s Creole seasoning.  I microwaved it, which I think would have been okay, but I overcooked it.  It was still somewhat edible.

I also ate some candy corn today. :/

I do realize that caramel apples and candy corn are not allowed!

Breakfast:

mixed berry chocolate shake (frozen mixed berries, 2 Tbsp ground flax, 1 cup water, 2 scoops Complete, 1 scoop Fiber, 4 drops chocolate Sweetleaf stevia)

5 Green Food caps

Snack:

1/2 cup Bolthouse Green Goodness

Lunch:

ratatouille “soup”

1/2 c brown rice w/ rice milk, cinnamon, and 1/8 tsp stevia powder

1 med honeycrisp apple

Snack:

tropical shake

Dinner:

gluten-free (rice noodle) canned chicken noodle soup

1/2 cup V8

Notes:

Lunch was a major fail.  I had a lot of leftover ratatouille from the other night; I did try it cold like the recipe said, and it would probably be okay on some crackers.  However, since I didn’t want to just eat it cold by itself, I got the idea to put some of it in the blender with some broth, puree, and then heat it up like soup.  It wasn’t terrible, but it wasn’t good, either.  I didn’t eat very much.

Then, since I was still hungry, I took cold brown rice, poured rice milk over it, and added cinnamon and stevia.  You know, kind of like cereal.  When I was little my mom sometimes served us leftover rice with milk, sugar and raisins.  Of course, that was white rice and cow’s milk, but I liked it back then.  But my new version wasn’t ringing my bell.

This was just a bad food day overall.  The family had tacos for supper.  I decided to try to make a taco salad with romaine, cilantro, tomatoes, salsa and leftover cold chicken breast.  First bite, the chicken disgusted me.  I didn’t eat it, but resorted to the canned soup.

Now that I’m almost done with the Standard Process Purification Program, I thought I’d put together a list of a few tips that might help others getting started.  Some of these I did, and some I just wish I had in hindsight.

At the beginning of the week:

  • Put together a big basic salad to keep in the fridge in a covered bowl.  Greens, cauliflower, broccoli, whole grape tomatoes, bell peppers…whatever you like that will stay fresh.  When you take out a serving, you can add items that won’t keep, such as avocado.
  • Similarly, make up  batches of brown rice and lentils (in my case, quinoa) to keep in the fridge and heat up when needed.
  • Mix up a couple of different salad dressings to have on hand, either from the SPPP recipes, or others that work with the program.  Store in mason jars, clean empty commercial dressing bottles, or Good Seasons bottles (I often find these at thrift stores for under $1).

Set up a smoothie-making station, preferably near the fridge so you have easy access to frozen fruit and the Complete powder (which must be refrigerated).

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You can use your regular blender, or a personal blender such as the Magic Bullet.  I bought a blend-and-go cup for my Oster blender, so I didn’t have to use the blender jar and and cup every time.

Here’s the big one that I didn’t do but wish I had:  plan out your meals!  I had a fridge full of veggies but no plan, so I was always just trying to come up with something at meal time, which led to a lot of unnecessary frustration and a few less-than-tasty meals.  Find recipes, make up a menu, and go shopping based on your plan.

The more prepared you are, the easier it will be to implement the program.  Set yourself up for success!

Breakfast:

homemade applesauce

raspberry chocolate shake (2 scoops Complete, 1 scoop Fiber, 1 cup water, 2 Tbsp ground flax, 4 drops chocolate Sweetleaf stevia)

5 Green Food caps

Lunch:

big southwest salad

Snack:

1/2 cup Bolthouse Green Goodness

1 Quaker Graham Pretzel Smashbar (sigh…another cheat)

Dinner:

more southwest salad with grilled chicken

Snack:

berry banana shake (frozen berries, 1/2 frozen banana, 1 cup water, 2 scoops Complete, 1 scoop Fiber, 1/8 tsp stevia powder)

5 Green Food caps

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